Tag: BLM

Holzweiler’s SS21 Campaign Stars Young Activists

Norwegian brand Holzweiler has launched its Spring/Summer 2021 campaign, starring young activists committed to causes including racial justice, LGBTQ+ rights and environmental action.Featured change makers have selected charities that Holzweiler will donate €5 EUR to for each Instagram “share,” on stories or feeds, that the campaign receives. Chi Ossé, the 22-year-old New York City Council candidate who emerged as a leader in the city’s Black Lives Matter protests, and The Book of Mormon star Myha’la Herrold have chosen gun violence prevention initiative Save Our Streets. Jari Jones, a transqueer model who recently fronted Calvin Klein’s 2020 Pride campaign, selected LGBTQ+ organization G.L.I.T.S. and climate justice activist Fiona Jarvis will benefit the International Indigenous Youth Council, committed to protecting the land and resources of indigenous communities.Take a look at Holzweiler’s SS21 campaign, shot by Drew Vickers, above.Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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Meet Topicals, the Skincare Brand De-Stigmatizing Skin Conditions in Women of Color

Growing up, 23-year-old entrepreneurs Olamide Olowe and Claudia Teng noticed that the skin conditions they suffered from — severe eczema and post-barbae folliculitis — were rarely represented on non-white skin tones. In addition, many of the treatments they tried weren’t suited to darker skin. “I could use an over-the-counter product that didn’t address my specific needs as a Black woman with darker skin, or spend thousands on pricey prescriptions,” Olowe shared. Thus, the idea for Topicals, the duo’s newly launched skincare brand, was born.The brand, which hits shelves (both virtual and physical) at Pop-In@Nordstrom, aims to de-stigmatize skin conditions and make their treatments less medically sterile and more fun. “For me, I knew there was a serious opportunity to create something affordable, and that not only educated a broad amount of people, but also made their treatment experience more enjoyable,” Teng explained.To start out, Topicals has launched targeted solutions for eczema and hyperpigmentation. Like Butter is a hydrating mask that soothes eczema-prone skin with ingredients including colloidal oatmeal, antimicrobial Chinese rhubarb root and anti-inflammatory turmeric. Faded, a serum, fights dark spots and discoloration with licorice root, an antioxidant and niacinamide, a popular ingredient for treating hyperpigmentation.Topicals is also addressing the mental health issues that can accompany skin conditions due to the shame surrounding them. The brand will donate one percent of its profits to various mental health organizations and has partnered with JED Foundation, an initiative that focuses on suicide prevention.Topicals’ Like Butter mask and Faded serum retail for $32 and $36 USD respectively, and are available at the Topicals website and Pop-In@Nordstrom.Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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Joy Crookes, Mabel and More UK Music Industry Professionals Sign Anti-Racism Letter

UK music professionals including artists, producers, record labels, managers, songwriters and agencies, have come together to speak out against racism, hate and inequality. Following the Black Lives Matter movement and rapper Wiley’s anti-semitic rant on Twitter last month, around 700 members have signed an open letter as part of the #NoSilenceInMusic campaign. The signatories emphasized: “Whether it be systemic racism and racial inequality highlighted by continued police brutality in America … We are at our worst when we attack one another.”Artists supporting this initiative include Rita Ora, Joy Crookes, Mabel, The 1975, Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall, Niall Horan, James Arthur, Bruno Major, Jonas Blue and more. Labels and agencies like Sony Music, Warner Music, Island Records and Universal Music Group have also signed the letter.Head on over to Medium for the full list of signatories and read the full statement below.”We, representatives from the music industry, write to demonstrate and express our determination, that love, unity and friendship, not division and hatred, must and will always be our common cause.In recent months through a series of events and incidents, the anti-Black racists and antisemites, plus those who advocate islamophobia, xenophobia, homophobia and transphobia, have repeatedly demonstrated that they clearly want us all to fail. Whether it be systemic racism and racial inequality highlighted by continued police brutality in America or anti-Jewish racism promulgated through online attacks, the result is the same: suspicion, hatred and division. We are at our worst when we attack one another.Minorities from all backgrounds and faiths have struggled and suffered. From slavery to the Holocaust we have painful collective memories. All forms of racism have the same roots — ignorance, lack of education and scapegoating. We, the British music industry are proudly uniting to amplify our voices, to take responsibility, to speak out and stand together in solidarity. Silence is not an option.There is a global love for music, irrespective of race, religion, sexuality and gender. Music brings joy and hope and connects us all. Through music, education and empathy we can find unity. We stand together, to educate and wipe out racism now and for our future generations.”Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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Virgil Abloh Establishes “I Support Young Black Businesses” Fundraiser

Following his “Post Modern” scholarship fund for Black fashion students last month, Virgil Abloh has launched another initiative via Off-White™️ to aid young Black businesses amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Dubbed the “I Support Young Black Businesses” fundraiser, all proceeds from this project will be donated to Chicago CRED (Create Real Economic Destiny), an organization dedicated to reducing local gun violence.Featuring a graphic tee and hoodie, the garments being sold as part of this fundraiser boast “I Support Young Black Businesses” in all caps on the front, while Off-White™️’s logo can be found on the back. This initiative will occur on a quarterly basis and will support a different organization, selected by Abloh and his team, each round.Off-White™️’s “I Support Young Black Businesses” T-shirt is priced at $220 USD, while the hoodie retails for $440 USD. Both are now available to purchase via Farfetch’s website. You can also make a direct donation to Chicago CRED’s GoFundMe page.Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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Jorja Smith’s New Single Addresses the Black Lives Matter Movement

British singer-songwriter Jorja Smith has released a new single, “By Any Means,” a bittersweet ballad reflecting on the Black Lives Matter movement. In a statement, Smith explained that the inspiration for the song “came from going to the Black Lives Matter protest and leaving thinking, what can I do to keep this conversation going? It’s not just a post on social media, it’s life.””By Any Means” is the lead track off Roc Nation’s upcoming project, Reprise, a collection of songs by multiple artists that address social justice. A portion of the proceeds from the compilation will be donated to organizations that support victims of police brutality, hate crimes and other civil rights violations.Stream “By Any Means” by Jorja Smith below, and stay tuned for Roc Nation’s Reprise.In case you missed it, Jorja Smith’s music video for “Rose Rouge” compiles footage from Black Lives Matter protests around the world.Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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These Are Our Readers’ Favorite Lipsticks by Black-Owned Beauty Brands

July 29 may seem like any other day on the calendar, but for many makeup lovers, today marks the annual celebration of the National Lipstick Day. For shoppers who are committed to buying Black, the list below will help you find some of the best lip colors from HYPEBAE readers’ favorite Black-owned beauty brands. From the vegan formulas of Mented Cosmetics to the metallic shades by UOMA Beauty, to the luxuriously packaged lipsticks from Pat McGrath Labs, these are the top picks you’ve shared with us.Coloured Raine Cosmetics Satin Lipstick “Cameo”[shoppable brand=”Coloured Raine Cosmetics” product=”Cameo Satin Lipstick” link=”https://colouredraine.com/collections/classic-lipstick/products/cameo” store=”Coloured Raine Cosmetics” price=”$17 USD”][/shoppable]Founded by Loraine R. Dowdy in 2013, Coloured Raine Cosmetics is a makeup company that celebrates diversity and self-expression through its thoughtfully formulated products and inclusive shade ranges. Made with vegan ingredients, the brand’s cruelty-free Satin Lipstick in “Cameo” ($17 USD) features a dusty rose hue with lavender undertones. The Crayon Case Matte Lippie “Bear”In 2017, Raynell Steward (aka Wuzzam Supa and Supa Cent) launched The Crayon Case, a fun and accessible brand made for makeup beginners and veterans alike. Promising all-day wear, the “Bear” Matte Lippie ($12 USD) is a waterproof liquid lipstick that sees a beautiful light brown color.Kitaka Natural Gloss “Morganite”[shoppable brand=” Kitaka” product=”Morganite Natural Gloss” link=”https://www.kitakaoflondon.co.uk/collections/natural-gloss/products/morganite” store=”Kitaka” price=”£16 GBP (Approx. $21 USD)”][/shoppable]Former fashion stylist Patrice Monique created her brand Kitaka with a mission to offer beauty enthusiasts high quality products that are made with natural, organic ingredients and recyclable packaging. The UK company’s Natural Gloss collection — including the soft pink “Morganite” (approximately $21 USD) — features a vegan and hydrating formula that gives your lips a plump look.Lolly Lips By Kyanna Lipstick “Meatball Power”Having struggled to find a lip color that complements her skin tone, three years ago, Kyanna Virgil became determined to start her own lipstick brand. Lolly Lips By Kyanna was officially launched in 2020, with a range of handmade liquid lipsticks that are vegan and cruelty-free. Its “Meatball Power” shade, a deep brown, ($10 USD) features a velvet matte finish. The Lip Bar Lipstick “Merlot”[shoppable brand=”The Lip Bar” product=”Merlot Lipstick” link=”https://thelipbar.com/products/merlot” store=”The Lip Bar” price=”$13 USD”][/shoppable]Melissa Butler launched The Lip Bar in 2012 with a goal to disrupt traditional beauty standards and to encourage people to embrace their individuality. A universally flattering burgundy shade, the brand’s “Merlot” lipstick ($13 USD) is a richly pigmented and smooth formula that’s vegan and cruelty-free.Mented Cosmetics Red Matte Lipstick “Red Carpet”[shoppable brand=”Mented Cosmetics” product=”Red Carpet Red Matte Lipstick” link=”https://www.mentedcosmetics.com/collections/lips/products/red-matte-lipstick?variant=31475545866305″ store=”Mented Cosmetics” price=”$18 USD”][/shoppable]The brainchild of co-founders KJ Miller and Amanda E. Johnson, Mented Cosmetics is an inclusive beauty brand designing makeup products with women of all skin tones in mind. Its blue-based red matte lipstick, “Red Carpet” ($18 USD), is formulated with vegan and non-toxic ingredients.UOMA Beauty Black Magic Metallic Lipstick “Savage”UOMA Beauty, founded by Sharon Chuter, is a makeup company that seeks to challenge outdated conventions with its innovative and shade-inclusive products. To achieve a statement-making lip, look to the brand’s Black Magic Metallic Lipstick in “Savage” ($36 USD), a high-shine red color packed with shimmer.Pat McGrath Labs MatteTrance Lipstick “Extravaganza”[shoppable brand=”Pat McGrath Labs” product=”Extravaganza MatteTrance Lipstick” link=”https://www.sephora.com/product/mattetrance-lipstick-P421813″ store=”Sephora” price=”$38 USD”][/shoppable]The namesake brand of the legendary makeup artist, Pat McGrath Labs is known for its high-impact makeup products, often used for creating some of the boldest beauty looks on the fashion week runway. A fan favorite, the MatteTrance Lipstick ($38 USD) delivers a a creamy, matte texture and comes packaged in a surrealist-inspired golden lip tube.Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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The Music Industry Was Built On Racism: For Equality, Prejudice Must Be Razed

I’m deeply deflated. Of all the shocks the past few weeks have delivered, from police brutality to acts of ignorance on social media, one stands out the greatest: as a Black man working in the creative industry, it astounds me that people are just now realizing that anti-racist activism is more than calling someone out for derogatory actions or posting a square-sized meme on Instagram.I want to believe I am free to be myself. However, my experiences tell me otherwise. I studied opera, classical singing and cello for over 13 years throughout my childhood, and I still recall being treated as the black sheep in the room. Conservatoire was deemed an endeavor strictly for rich, white kids. “Are you adopted?” a friend’s parent asked me at a grade-two cello lesson. Back then, I was oblivious to what that question really meant. Music is supposed to unify, not disqualify. However, the industry is full of prejudice — which I’ve experienced first-hand — and has ultimately scrambled to show its support for the Black community.The killing of George Floyd outraged society and awakened a mutual understanding that racism derives from the exploitation of Black and brown people who bear the brunt of systemic biases. While acknowledging racism through statements issued by record labels carries some weight, an industry that shamelessly exploits Black music must take further action against discrimination. Racism in the music industry flows to the very core of its structure, affecting employees, the media and the artists themselves.The American entertainment industry is in the midst of a reckoning relating to representation or rather, a lack thereof. A study conducted by Dr. Stacy L. Smith finds a profound lack of diversity on Billboard’s Hot 100 between 2012 and 2018, reporting that only eight out of 1,093 producing credits (sampled across 400 popular songs) went to women of color. The Recording Academy’s Grammy Award for Album Of The Year, the music industry’s most covetable prize, is more likely to be taken by white artists. In the entire history of the Grammys, only 10 Black artists have won the distinction.These statistics paint a far from equitable picture. Research by Susan T. Fiske notes that, over time, overt racism has become less acceptable, pushing people to express prejudice in more subtle ways. However, discrimination still takes place. At the end of the day, white people in positions of power must grapple with their own privileges and hold racially driven conversations, as uncomfortable as they may be, to make real change.Disparity in music stems from colonialist beliefs. An essay by critical theorist Nebal Maysaud argues that Western appreciation for certain genres of music, particularly classical music, is innately racist. “Western classical music is not about culture. It’s about whiteness. It’s a combination of European traditions which serve the specious belief that whiteness has a culture — one that is superior to all others,” the theorist writes. “Its main purpose is to be a cultural anchor for the myth of white supremacy. In that regard, people of color can never truly be pioneers of Western classical music. The best we can be are exotic guests: entertainment for the white audiences and an example of how Western classical music is more elite than the cultures of people of color,” he concludes.“White people are still the majority when it comes to the power brokers in the music industry, and I think that doesn’t allow the space for BIPOC artists to create and to be represented in a nuanced way.” — Jayda GMaysaud’s research and its connotations, which reveal deep-seated prejudice, are rarely acknowledged in today’s music industry, which is predominantly run by white executives. The lack of diversity in the industry’s workforce doesn’t reflect the music these companies are financing. The term R&B was coined, after all, to replace race music mirroring a reality that glosses over Western imperialism and its cultural implications. Race music has bolstered the charts for as long as Gen Z can remember, dominating the airwaves and serving global audiences for decades. DJ and producer Jayda G agrees: “White people are still the majority when it comes to the power brokers in the music industry, and I think that doesn’t allow the space for BIPOC artists to create and to be represented in a nuanced way.” To grapple with white supremacy is also to challenge the framework of the music industry. Considering that contemporary music is dominated by hip-hop and R&B, it seems strange that record labels are white-run yet Black-fueled.Black artists are still penalized for their contributions to music. As reported by BBC, singer-songwriter Alexandra Burke spoke up about the oppression she faced at the hands of the music industry. In a 15-minute-long Instagram video, the artist explained how white executives would chastise her for sporting hairstyles that wouldn’t appeal to a white audience. On the flip side, Connecticut-hailing artist ANoyd reports that blackface among white artists abounds. “Many Caucasian women artists came in looking totally different from who they are now,” he says. According to ANoyd, white artists will style themselves with lip injections and dark makeup to make themselves look Black. “Literally stripping the African American identity as if it’s just a costume, just for acceptance into hip hop culture,” he explains.To shift the balance of power, music must acknowledge the crucial contributions Black and brown people have made to the industry throughout history. “There’s an average folk who believes rap is all Afro-Americans produce, not recognizing that African music has been the root of popular genres for more than a century,” Brighton musician Michele Brivio reflects. If we fail to acknowledge the labor of minorities, whose practices have established a legacy in music, then we have completely lost the plot.”Many Caucasian women artists came in looking totally different from who they are now. Literally stripping the African American identity as if it’s just a costume, just for acceptance into hip hop culture.” — ANoydMusic, just like fashion, is an art form that is supposed to break down barriers rather than build them up. In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic and Black Lives Matter protests, discussions of global race relations in popular culture have amplified, as many artists begin politicizing their music with renewed urgency. Record label and publisher BMG recently pledged to address historic inequalities in the record contracts of black artists. In an e-mail sent to managers and performers, BMG CEO Hartwig Masuch said the label was “mindful of the shameful treatment of black artists,” and would begin a review of historic record contracts, vowing to address major cases of “inequalities or anomalies.”Today’s world is drastically different than decades past. Racist language was once an accepted part of everyday vocabulary. Bigoted comedians and unflattering stereotypes were the norm. However, the demands of activists throughout history have been repeated again and again. Anguish, rage and sadness have been expressed by marginalized communities many times before. Reasonable, open-minded people across generations have had the same conversations on race that we’re having right now. Each generation feels the end of racism and prejudice is near simply because they are more progressive than the one before. This way of thinking encourages complacency.We cannot continue to overlook or remain complacent about the music industry’s response to racism. If we are to have a serious conversation about racism, individual and corporate accountability must be taken. For instance, an industry blackout during a pandemic — when most members of staff are furloughed, venues are closed and gigs are pushed back — has been championed with little sense of irony or self-awareness. Unless we’re careful, mindful and vigilant of one another, companies that profit from racism will be able to attach their logos to anti-racist slogans, quotes and earnestly written Instagram posts in order to co-opt the Black Lives Matter movement for their own gain, as they’ve done previously with feminism and Pride.While protesting is an integral part of the cause and is of course important for the visibility of a cause, protest alone is not enough. Being informed about the issue is important and the sharing of books, documentaries, songs, films and resources is definitely a step towards the right direction, if perhaps a little misguided.“Prejudice can never be erased. Only constantly addressed, monitored and highlighted.” — Tank GodHow much harder do Black artists need to work in order to achieve success? For there to be meaningful change, we must acknowledge the consequences of exploitation. As a society that claims to champion equality, there is a scandalous lack of representation in music that restricts Black artists from excelling beyond the confines they are forced into by Western dominance. As American producer and songwriter Tank God puts it, “Prejudice can never be erased. Only constantly addressed, monitored and highlighted.”The music industry is a pool of wealth and it is important that those with influence use not only their words to combat racism, but also their resources. Substantive change will require constant education, dialogue and pressure. It’s difficult to change ingrained ways of thinking, but that is precisely what needs to happen for any real progress to take place. We’re in it for the long haul.Chidozie Obasi is a UK-based journalist, reporter and writer. His editorial roles specialize in trends, fashion, entertainment and cultural affairs. Working across news and features, Obasi has compiled in-depth pieces and short reads on a variety of subjects, ranging from social activism to game-changing supermodels. You can connect with Obasi on Instagram and his website.Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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Gender-Neutral Skincare Brand Ayond Is Pioneering the Four-Step Routine

If you’re looking for more Black-owned businesses to support, add Ayond to your list. Founded in 2019 by former fashion designer Shani Van Breukelen, the clean skincare brand boasts a streamlined range of four unisex products — cleanser, serum, face oil and cream — for an effective yet low-maintenance routine.Packaged in sleek, design-conscious bottles and jars, all products are non-toxic, vegan and cruelty-free. Ayond allows customers to send empty containers from any brand back to its headquarters at no cost, facilitating the recycling process. Adding to its sustainable practices, the brand’s shipping material, such as cardboard boxes and sleeves, are made from 100 percent post-consumer paper and all cellophane wrapping is compostable.Ayond’s Metamorph Cleansing Balm removes dirt and makeup without stripping skin of hydration. The Rock Rose Face Serum contains soothing rose extract, aloe leaf juice and moisturizing hyaluronic acid while the Amber Elix Face Oil protects from oxidative stress with vitamin E and omega 3 fatty acids. Lastly, the Taos Blue Day Cream is a lightweight moisturizer formulated with rosehip and jojoba oil.Head to the Ayond website to learn more about the brand’s four-step skincare routine.For more Black-owned businesses, check out Beyoncé and Zerina Akers’ directory, Black Owned Everything.Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBAE

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